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What does PLC stand for?


PLC
stands for "Programmable Logic Controller". It is a type of computer used in industrial automation to control machines and processes. PLCs can be programmed to perform a wide range of tasks, such as monitoring inputs from sensors, controlling outputs to actuators, and making decisions based on a set of logical rules. They are widely used in a variety of industries such as manufacturing, oil and gas, mining, and transportation.

PLC's Applications:


Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) are widely used in a variety of industries for industrial automation and control. Some common applications of PLCs include:

Manufacturing:
PLCs are used to control machines and processes in factories, such as conveyor systems, assembly lines, and packaging machines.

Oil and gas:
PLCs are used to control and monitor processes in the oil and gas industry, such as drilling, refining, and pipeline management.

Mining:
PLCs are used to control and monitor heavy machinery and processes in the mining industry, such as drilling, excavating, and ore processing.

Transportation:
PLCs are used to control and monitor processes in the transportation industry, such as traffic signals, transportation systems and elevators.

Power generation:
PLCs are used to control and monitor processes in power generation plants, such as boilers, turbines, and generators.

Water and wastewater treatment:
PLCs are used to control and monitor processes in water and wastewater treatment plants, such as water treatment, pump stations and sewage treatment.

Building automation:
PLCs are used to control and monitor building systems, such as HVAC, lighting, and security systems.

Agriculture:
PLCs are used to control and monitor processes in the agriculture industry, such as irrigation, crop processing, and dairy management.

These are just some examples of the many industries and applications that use PLCs. The specific application will determine the type of PLC, the number of I/O points, memory, processing speed and communication required.


How does a PLC work?


A Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) is a type of computer that is used in industrial automation to control machines and processes. PLCs are designed to be rugged and durable, and they can operate in harsh industrial environments.

The basic operation of a PLC can be broken down into several steps:

Inputs:
A PLC receives input signals from various sensors and devices, such as limit switches, photoelectric sensors, and temperature sensors. These input signals are then processed by the PLC.

Processing:
The PLC processes the input signals and the program stored in its memory, which is typically written in a specialized programming language, such as ladder logic or function block diagrams.

Outputs:
Based on the input signals and the program, the PLC generates output signals that control various actuators, such as motors, valves, and relays.

Communication:
PLCs can also communicate with other devices and systems, such as Human Machine Interface (HMI), Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, and other PLCs, using different communication protocols.

Monitoring:
PLCs can also monitor the status of the system and log data for further analysis.

Overall, PLCs work by receiving input signals, processing them according to a program, and generating output signals to control machines and processes. The program is stored in the PLC's memory, and can be easily updated or modified as needed.


Important PLC specifications:


The specific specifications for a PLC will vary depending on the manufacturer and model, but some common specifications include:

Input/Output (I/O) capacity:
The number of input and output points that the PLC can handle.

Memory:
The amount of memory available for storing programs and data.

Processing speed:
The speed at which the PLC can process instructions and perform operations.

Communication:
The communication protocols supported by the PLC, such as Ethernet, Modbus, and Profinet.

Power supply:
The voltage and current required to power the PLC.

Environmental:
The PLC is rated to operate under certain temperature and humidity ranges.

Size and weight:
The physical dimensions and weight of the PLC.

Programming software:
The software used to program and configure the PLC.

Certifications:
Safety and performance certifications such as UL, CE, and CSA.

Compatibility:
Compatibility with other equipment such as sensors, actuators, and HMI.

It is important to select a PLC that meets the specific requirements of your application and that is compatible with the rest of your equipment.


PLC Programming Methods:


There are several methods for programming a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), including:

Ladder logic:
Ladder logic is the most common programming method used for PLCs. It is based on a diagram that resembles an electrical ladder, with contacts, coils, and rungs representing inputs, outputs, and logical connections.

Function block diagram (FBD):
FBD is a graphical programming method that uses function blocks, which represent different functions, such as timers, counters, and mathematical operations.

Structured text (ST):
ST is a programming method that uses a high-level programming language, similar to C or Pascal, to write programs.

Sequential Function Chart (SFC):
SFC is a graphical programming method that uses a flowchart to represent the sequence of operations in a program.

Instruction List (IL):
IL is a low-level programming method that uses a simple, mnemonic-based language to write programs.

Statemented mnemonic:
Conditioned mnemonic is a programming method that uses a simple, mnemonic-based language to write programs, but it allows for more complex logic statements.

It is important to note that different PLC models and manufacturers may support different programming methods, and some may also support a combination of methods


Benefits of PLC's


Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) offer a number of benefits over traditional hard-wired control systems. Some of the main benefits of PLCs include:

Flexibility:
PLCs can be programmed to perform a wide range of tasks, such as monitoring inputs from sensors, controlling outputs to actuators, and making decisions based on a set of logical rules. This flexibility allows PLCs to be used in a wide range of industrial automation and control applications.

Reliability:
PLCs are designed to operate in harsh industrial environments, and they are built to be rugged and durable. They are less likely to fail than hard-wired control systems, which can improve overall system reliability.

Ease of programming:
PLCs are easy to program and can be programmed using a variety of programming methods, such as ladder logic, function block diagrams, and structured text, which allows for a simple and efficient programming process.

Ease of maintenance:
PLCs are designed to be easily maintained, with built-in diagnostic and troubleshooting capabilities. They can be easily reprogrammed and reconfigured, which can reduce downtime and maintenance costs.

Cost-effectiveness:
PLCs are cost-effective compared to traditional hard-wired control.

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